Snark and Boojum Today

Lewis Carroll’s and Henry Holiday’s The Hunting of the Snark made me digging into British history and the history the Anglican church (especially the Oxford Movement).

It’s not history, at least not a finished one.

To me, Carroll’s tragicomedy (a tragedy in Henry Holiday’s view) is about the doctrinal conflicts (some of them lethal) arising along the travel to truth, whatever that might be. These conflicts within and between belief systems surely didn’t end today. Also the concrete disputes which might have inspired the Rev. Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) in the 19th century seem to be going on even today. All that is quite strange to me (not only because I am a German). I can’t take sides, because I don’t even understand how and why the disputed issues can be issues at all.

http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/church-england-has-sent-clear-message-its-conservative-churchgoers-youre-not-wanted-1611289:

The Church of England has sent a clear message to its conservative churchgoers – you’re not wanted
The treatment of Bishop Philip North, an Anglo-Catholic, shows the Church’s prospects for unity are grim.
By Andrew Sabisky March 13, 2017 13:16 GMT

It is with a heavy heart that I must announce that the Church of England is at it again. Fresh off a truly disastrous session of General Synod (the Church’s parliament), it has plunged itself headlong into further public ignominy.

The latest disaster concerns Bishop Philip North, currently the Bishop of Burnley. He was chosen by the bureaucracy to be the new Bishop of Sheffield (a promotion from suffragan to diocesan status). []

Not only the ongoing struggles in the Anglican Church still are turning Snarks into Boojums. The multicultural beasts are very alife today, perhaps more than ever.

Eternal Disconnect

All men shall not be saved at the length. They also are worthy of condemnation, who endeavour at this time in restore the dangerous opinion that all men, by they never so ungodly, shall at length be saved, when they have suffered pains for their sins a certain time appointed by God’s justice.

Article 42 in Thomas Cranmer’s Forty-Two Articles (1552)

 

No one shall speak to the Man at the Helm, and the Man at the Helm shall speak to no one.

Rule 42 mentioned in Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark (1876)

 
As far as I understand, eternal damnation was a controversial issue in the Oxford Movement, and the Rev. C. L. Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) did not subscribe to that. Could Rule 42 in The Hunting of the Snark be a reference to Article 42 in Thomas Cranmer’s Forty-Two Articles?

 
Links:

snrk.de

Since 2012 this is the place for snrk.de. The site is about Lewis Carroll‘s, Henry Holiday‘s illustrations (engraved by Joseph Swain) to the tragicomical ballad The Hunting of the Snark.

 
Contact:


On 2017-10-09, snrk.de underwent a major change. The site turned into a blog. If you used links to snrk.de and your browser doesn’t find them anymore: Some of these links still may work if you replace snrk.de by old.snrk.de.

The Ocean Chart

Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark (1876) has been published “with nine illustrations by Henry Holiday”. But there are ten illustrations. One possible explanation: The Ocean-Chart (aka the Bellman’s map) has not been made by Henry Holiday and Joseph Swain.

The map presently is used to navigate the United Kingom through the Brexit.

more

Snarks Have Five Unmistakable Marks

    “Come, listen, my men, while I tell you again
        The five unmistakable marks
    By which you may know, wheresoever you go,
        The warranted genuine Snarks.

  1.     “Let us take them in order. The first is the taste,
            Which is meagre and hollow, but crisp:
        Like a coat that is rather too tight in the waist,
            With a flavour of Will-o’-the-wisp.
  2.     “Its habit of getting up late you’ll agree
            That it carries too far, when I say
        That it frequently breakfasts at five-o’clock tea,
            And dines on the following day.
  3.     “The third is its slowness in taking a jest.
            Should you happen to venture on one,
        It will sigh like a thing that is deeply distressed:
            And it always looks grave at a pun.
  4.     “The fourth is its fondness for bathingmachines,
            Which is constantly carries about,
        And believes that they add to the beauty of scenes –
            A sentiment open to doubt.
  5.     “The fifth is ambition. It next will be right
            To describe each particular batch:
        Distinguishing those that have feathers, and bite,
            And those that have whiskers, and scratch.

    “For, although common Snarks do no manner of harm,
        Yet, I feel it my duty to say,
    Some are Boojums –” The Bellman broke of in alarm,
        For the Baker had fainted away.

    “He remarked to me then,” said that mildest of men,
        “ ‘If your Snark be a Snark, that is right:
    Fetch it home by all means – you may serve it with greens,
        And it’s handy for striking a light.

    “ ‘You may seek it with thimbles—and seek it with care;
        You may hunt it with forks and hope;
    You may threaten its life with a railway-share;
        You may charm it with smiles and soap –’ ”

    (“That’s exactly the method,” the Bellman bold
        In a hasty parenthesis cried,
    “That’s exactly the way I have always been told
        That the capture of Snarks should be tried!”)

Snark in the Woods

Forestry Commission of England:

NEWS RELEASE No: 16687
14 SEPTEMBER 2017

Arts Council England grant awarded for exciting forest theatre experiences

The Arts Council has awarded £139,000 to the Forestry Commission and theatre partner Burn the Curtain to develop their outdoor theatre experiences. The substantial grant will enable Burn the Curtain to tour their sell-out evening theatre show, The Company of Wolves, based on the stories by Angela Carter, to three more forest locations this autumn.

In addition, a new theatre show will be developed around the nonsense poem by Lewis Carroll, ‘The Hunting of the Snark’. The experience will tour across seven forests in 2018 and will be accompanied by ‘Snark Hunter’, an innovative app which will bring the poem to life for forest visitors across the country. []

(Thanks to Doug Howick for drawing my attention to this.)

Links:

Waistcoat Poetry

 

There was an old man of Port Grigor,
Whose actions were noted for vigour;
He stood on his head
till his waistcoat turned red,
That eclectic old man of Port Grigor.

Edward Lear, 1872

 

He was black in the face,
and they scarcely could trace
The least likeness to what he had been:
While so great was his fright
that his waistcoat turned white –
A wonderful thing to be seen!

Lewis Carroll, from “The Hunting of the Snark”, 1876

 

What I tell you three times is true!

The Bellman’s Rule is stated in Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark, line #7 and line #335.

#! /usr/bin/haskell
import Data.List
statementList =
  ["Grand Fenwick steals our jobs!"
  ,"There are 10 Snark hunters."
  ,"There are 10 Snark hunters."
  ,"There are 9 Snark hunters."
  ,"Grand Fenwick steals our jobs!"
  ,"There are 9 Snark hunters."
  ,"6 * 7 = 39"
  ,"6 * 7 = 39"
  ,"There are 10 Snark hunters."
  ,"6 * 7 = 42"
  ,"Grand Fenwick steals our jobs!"
  ,"There are 10 Snark hunters."
  ,"6 * 7 = 39"
  ,"There are 10 Snark hunters."
  ]
atLeastThrice :: [String] -> [String]
atLeastThrice sL = [head grp | grp <- group $ sort sL, length grp >= 3]

Result (if loaded and executed in GHCI):
Prelude> atLeastThrice statementList
["6 * 7 = 39","Grand Fenwick steals our jobs!","There are 10 Snark hunters."]

»L.C. forgot that “the Snark” is a tragedy«

Page from a letter (1876-01-04) by C.L. Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll) to Henry Holiday. The two lines at the bottom are notes written by Henry Holiday.

Source: www.pbagalleries.com/…

I think the note is:

× L.C. forgot that “the Snark” is a tragedy and [should]
on no account be made jovial. h.h.