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Page 83

Examples for advertising the 1st edition of “The Hunting of the Snark”, then offered for €200 and more:

First edition, first printing, with “Baker” for “Banker” on page 83.

First issue with “baker” not “butcher” on page 83. It is unknown how many copies were printed this way.

This is about line 560 on page 83, the last page of Lewis Carroll’s tragicomedy. It’s not rare. All copies are printed this way, because that’s how is should be. In Henry Holiday’s illustration on page 82 you see the head and a hand of the Baker, not the Banker. Remember, the Banker had to be left behind in the previous chapter.

So there is nothing special about “Where the Baker had met with the Snark.” Those rare book traders just don’t check the facts.

Then there is the JubJub. If you read somewhere that the bird never will look at a “bride”, then better check line 386 on page 55 in the original Snark edition.

Face Change

In an early draft to the illustration The Crew on Deck in Lewis Carroll’s The Hunting of the Snark, the illustrator Henry Holiday gave the Bellman a different face than the one which the Bellman had in the final illustration. Henry Holiday didn’t discard the original face. He moved that round faced character to the illustration The Barrister’s Dream and then turned the Bellman in the illustration The Crew on Deck into a Darwin look-alike.

Alice in the Woods

Bycatch from my Snark hunt:

I don’t know who borrowed from whom. And there are more paintings by Bonomi Edward Warren where he recycled that forest scene.

The Bandersnatched Banker

Just leaving some marks on Instragram.

#SnarkAllusion — ※ Left: The Banker after his encounter with the #Bandersnatch, depicted in an illustration (woodcut by #JosephSwain for block printing) by #HenryHoliday to the chapter "The Banker’s Fate" in #TheHuntingOfTheSnark" by #LewisCarroll (scanned from an original 1876 1st edition of the book) ※ Right: Slightly horizontally compressed rendering of "The Imagebreakers" (1566-1568) aka "Allegory of Iconoclasm" aka "The Iconoclasts", an #etching by #MarcusGheeraertsTheElder (#BritishMuseum, Dept. of Print and Drawings, 1933.1.1.3. (See also Edward Hodnett: Marcus Gheeraerts the Elder, Utrecht 1971, pp. 25-29.) Henry Holiday flipped the “nose” of Gheeraert’s “head” before using it as the Banker’s nose in his pictorial allusion to Gheeraerts’ etching. Probably not intended by Gheeraets but discovered by Holiday: Flipping the nose yields a different nose with a different shape. — I published an article about this in the “Knight Letter” 99 of the Lewis Carroll Society of North America: http://nose.snrk.de — #スナーク狩り #MarcusGheeraerts #ArtAnalysis #VictorianLiterature #VictorianIllustration #VictorianWoodcut #ReferentialArt #PictorialAllusion #LewisCarrollSociety #16thCenturyArt #16thCenturyPrint #16thCenturyEtching #19thCenturyArt #19thCenturyIllustration #UnusualArt #Bandersnatch #Reformation #Bildzitat #PictorialReference #SideBySide #Vergleich

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more: http://nose.snrk.de

Snark in the Woods

Update 2018-02-22: https://www.forestry.gov.uk/snarkhunter


2017-09-17

Forestry Commission of England:

NEWS RELEASE No: 16687
14 SEPTEMBER 2017

Arts Council England grant awarded for exciting forest theatre experiences

The Arts Council has awarded £139,000 to the Forestry Commission and theatre partner Burn the Curtain to develop their outdoor theatre experiences. The substantial grant will enable Burn the Curtain to tour their sell-out evening theatre show, The Company of Wolves, based on the stories by Angela Carter, to three more forest locations this autumn.

In addition, a new theatre show will be developed around the nonsense poem by Lewis Carroll, ‘The Hunting of the Snark’. The experience will tour across seven forests in 2018 and will be accompanied by ‘Snark Hunter’, an innovative app which will bring the poem to life for forest visitors across the country. []

(Thanks to Doug Howick for drawing my attention to this.)

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